5901 E Kings Highway, Shreveport, La
Hours: Mon-Sat: 8:30am - 5pm | Closed Sunday
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On June 1st, 2018 by Kathie Rowell

June garden tips

Posted In:
Blog-Tips | Tips

Continue to plant warm-season plants, such as begonias, gerbera daisies, coleus, marigolds, periwinkles, pentas, ornamental sweet potatoes, lantana, torenias, ageratum, angelonias and caladiums. Before replanting, give your soil a boost with Vital Earth compost and Fertilome Bedding Plant Food.

Plant seeds of okra, Southern peas, pumpkins, watermelons, cucumbers, summer squash and cantaloupes.

Continue to plant herbs, such as basil, oregano, thyme, mint and rosemary.

Plant seeds of fast-growing annual flowers, such as zinnias, sunflowers, morning glories and moonvines.

Deadhead roses and continue a spray program to prevent blackspot and powdery mildew. We recommend Fertilome Systemic Fungicide, or Serenade for organic gardeners.

Watch the lawn for signs of brown patch and chinch bugs. Treat brown patch with Fertilome F-Stop. Apply Hi-Yield Bug Blaster or Cyonara Lawn and Garden Spray to control chinch bugs.

Keep annuals and perennials deadheaded to prolong blooming.

Apply Sluggo if damage from snails and slugs occurs.

Move houseplants onto the deck or patio for the warm months. Repot those that are crowded and performing poorly.

Irrigate lawns, landscape and garden beds, including newly planted trees and shrubs, in the absence of rain.

Maintain 2 to 3 inches of organic mulch -- chopped leaves, pine straw, bark -- in beds to hold water and deter weeds.

Watch crape myrtles for signs of powdery mildew and scale. Treat powdery mildew with Fertilome Systemic Fungicide and scale with Hi-Yield Systemic Insect Spray.

Control weeds, either by hand pulling, cultivation or herbicide. If you choose a spray herbicide, use it on a calm day and avoid application during high heat.

Watch for canna leaf rollers, which can decimate foliage. If present, treat with Dipel dust, Fertilome 2-N-1 Drench or Hi Yield Systemic Insect Spray.


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On June 1st, 2018 by Kathie Rowell

Butterflies topic of talk

Posted In:
Blog | Blog-Tips

Northwest Louisiana Master Gardener Mike Livingston, who is in charge of the butterfly garden at the Randle T. Moore Center, shared great information and tips for attracting butterflies to your yard at a recent talk. Here's a brief recap:

Butterflies like a sunny spot sheltered from the wind and large swaths of plants of different heights, colors, shapes and species. Provide a "puddling" area where they can get water and salt and at least two host plants.

Host plants:

  • Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa)
  • Passionvine (Passiflora incarnata)
  • Rue (Rue graveolens)
  • Fennel (Foeniculum)
  • Pussy willow (Salix discolor)
  • Pipevine (Aristolochia fimbriata)

Nectar plants

  • Abelia (Abelia grandiflora)
  • Agastache foeniculum (Anise hyssop)
  • Blanket flower (Gaillardia)
  • Butterfly bush (Buddleia)
  • Butterfly penta (Pentas lanceolata)
  • Purple coneflower (Echinacea)
  • Joe Pye weed (Eutrochium)
  • Lantana (Lantana camara)
  • Phlox (various)
  • Porterweed (Stachytarpheta)
  • Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)
  • Verbena (various)
  • Zinnia (various)

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On May 1st, 2018 by Kathie Rowell

Celebrate Mom!

Posted In:
Blog | Blog-Tips

Mother's Day is just around the corner and we're stocked with a multitude of planters and hanging baskets, as well as garden and home decor. Drop by to browse. You're sure to find something that will put a smile on her face.


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On May 1st, 2018 by Kathie Rowell

May garden tips

Posted In:
Blog-Tips | Tips

Cool-season annuals begin to decline in May and should be replaced with warm-season bedding plants, such as begonias, geraniums, angelonia, coleus, marigolds, periwinkles and pentas. Before replanting, boost soil with Vital Earth compost and Fertilome Bedding Plant Food.

Plant seeds of fast-growing annual flowers, such as zinnias, sunflowers, morning glories and moonvines.

Plant seeds of okra, Southern peas, pumpkins, sweet corn, watermelons, cucumbers, butter beans, squash, cantaloupes, collards and eggplants (transplants). Snap beans, butter beans, sweet corn, tomatoes and peppers (transplants) should be planted in the early days of May to prevent poor fruit set due to high temperatures.

Continue to plant herbs, such as basil, oregano, thyme, mint, chives, sage and rosemary.

Deadhead roses and continue a spray program to prevent blackspot and powdery mildew. We recommend Fertilome Systemic Fungicide, or Serenade for organic gardeners.

Plant new summer-flowering bulbs and rhizomes, such as lily of the Nile and canna lilies.

Watch the lawn for signs of brown patch, which often shows up during cool, wet weather. If you identify an outbreak, treat your lawn with Fertilome F-Stop.

Apply Sluggo if damage from snails and slugs occurs.

Spray trees affected by scale insects with Bonide All-Seasons Horticultural Oil. Crape myrtles should be treated for crape myrtle bark scale with either Fertilome Tree and Shrub Drench or Hi-Yield Systemic Insect Spray.

Watch azaleas for lacebugs. You’ll know they are present if the leaves are white and green speckled and the underside of the foliage has dark specks. Control them with Fertilome Triple Action or Bonide All Seasons Horticultural Oil.


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On March 31st, 2018 by Kathie Rowell

April garden tips

Posted In:
Blog-Tips | Tips

  • Begin planting warm-season bedding plants, such as begonias, geraniums, gerbera daisies, coleus, marigolds, salvia and pentas. If your soil could use a boost, enrich it with Vital Earth compost and Fertilome Bedding Plant Food.
  • Cool-season annuals should be at their peak this month. Keep them flourishing by deadheading and fertilizing with Fertilome Bedding Plant Food.
  • Plant seeds of corn, cucumber, beans, peas, summer squash, snap beans, cantaloupe and watermelon. Transplant tomatoes and peppers. Improve your garden soil by incorporating Vital Earth compost.
  • Set aside a portion of your veggie garden or flower bed for herbs, such as basil, oregano, mint, sage, chives and rosemary.
  • Don’t dump your Easter lily after the holiday is past! Cut the bloom off after it fades and set the plant into a spot where it will receive morning sun and afternoon shade. It will go dormant in the summer but come back and bloom again next April or May.
  • Continue to plant roses, and fertilize established roses if you didn’t last month. We recommend Rose-tone organic plant food.
  • Continue a spray program to prevent blackspot on roses. We recommend Fertilome Systemic Fungicide.
  • Watch the lawn for signs of brown patch, which often shows up during cool, wet weather. If it does, treat with Fertilome F-Stop.
  • Plant new perennials and fertilize established clumps with Fertilome Bedding Plant Food.
  • Dig and divide crowded perennials, such as Shasta daisies, black-eyed susans, phlox and purple coneflowers, early in the month.
  • Apply Sluggo if damage from snails and slugs occurs.
  • Fertilize azaleas and camellias after they have finished blooming. We recommend Holly-tone organic plant food for all woody plants.
  • Spray trees affected by scale insects with Bonide All-Seasons Horticultural Oil.
  • Watch azaleas for lacebugs. You’ll know they are present if the leaves are white and green speckled and the underside of the foliage has dark specks. Control them with Fertilome Triple Action or Bonide All Seasons Horticultural Oil.

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On March 2nd, 2018 by Kathie Rowell

March garden tips

Posted In:
Blog-Tips | Tips

Continue to install trees and shrubs into the landscape to get them off to a good start before hot weather arrives.

Keep cool-season annuals flourishing by deadheading and fertilizing with Fertilome Bedding Plant Food.

Remove the old flowers and developing seed pods from perennial spring-flowering bulbs, such as daffodils and snowflakes. Leave the foliage until it turns yellow and falls over so it can feed the bulb and create a new flower for next year.

Continue to plant roses, and fertilize established roses.  We recommend Rose-tone organic plant food.

Begin a spray program to prevent blackspot on roses as soon as leaves sprout. We recommend Fertilome Systemic Fungicide.

Plant new summer-flowering bulbs and divide the established clumps in your yard.

Plant seeds of corn, cucumber, beans, peas, summer squash, cantaloupe and watermelon after danger of frost is over – usually mid-March in North Louisiana. Transplant tomatoes and peppers. Improve your garden soil by incorporating Vital Earth compost.

Apply a weed-and-feed product to fertilize your grass and prevent weeds.

Watch the lawn for signs of brown patch, which often shows up during cool, wet weather. If it shows up, treat with Fertilome F-Stop.

Plant new perennials and fertilize established clumps with Fertilome Bedding Plant Food.

Dig and divide crowded perennials such as Shasta daisies, black-eyed susans, phlox, day lilies and purple coneflowers.

Apply Sluggo if damage from snails and slugs occurs.

Fertilize established shrubs. We recommend Holly-tone organic plant food for all woody plants.

Watch azaleas for lacebugs. You’ll know they are present if the leaves are white and green speckled and the underside of the foliage has dark specks. Control them with Fertilome Triple Action or Bonide All Seasons Horticultural Oil.

Finish pruning  evergreen and summer flowering trees and shrubs. Prune spring-flowering shrubs like azaleas, forsythia and quince only after they finish blooming, if needed.

Add mulch underneath camellias, azaleas and other shrubs if coverage has thinned over winter.


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On February 1st, 2018 by Kathie Rowell

February garden tips

Posted In:
Blog-Tips | Tips

  • Plant new roses, and prune established  plants. Wait to prune climbers and once-bloomers, like many old garden roses, until after they flower.
  • Clean and prepare flower and garden beds for spring. Be careful not to damage emerging perennials.
  • Watch azaleas for lacebugs. You’ll know they are present if the leaves are white and green speckled and the underside of the foliage has dark specks.  Control them with Fertilome Triple Action or Hi-Yield Systemic Insect Spray.
  • Prune deciduous and evergreen plants that don’t flower in the spring.
  • Trim dead growth on ornamental grasses before the new growth begins.
  • Clip the dead leaves from cast iron plants, or cut them back to the ground if most of the foliage has become brown and ragged.
  • Deadhead and fertilize cool-season plants like pansies, snapdragons and dianthus with Fertilome Bedding Plant Food.
  • Plant Irish potatoes.
  • Set out transplants of such cool-season veggies as broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce and onions.
  • Plant seeds of tomatoes and peppers inside under lights so you’ll have transplants ready to set out in spring.
  • Plant trees and shrubs to take advantage of cooler weather and spring rains as they settle into their new homes.
  • Apply Dimension pre-emergent herbicide to lawns and flower beds to stop weeds before they sprout.
  • Plant fruit trees and bushes, such as figs, blueberries, blackberries and raspberries.
  • Purchase seeds for warm-season flowers and veggies while the selection is good.
  • Get your soil tested. If amendments are required, a winter application will make them available for spring planting. We have LSU AgCenter soil test kits available.

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On January 1st, 2018 by Kathie Rowell

Camellias beautify dreary winter days

Posted In:
Blog

Don’t you feel sorry for gardeners who live where there are no winter flowers?

Camellias are the super stars of winter garden in the South, lighting up the landscape with lovely flowers in red, rose, pink, white and bicolors. Plant now and you'll be able to enjoy them for many weeks.

Both Camellia japonica and Camellia sasanqua, the two varieties most often planted here, prefer a partial shade location. A well-drained spot where they will receive about four to six hours of morning sun with afternoon shade is ideal. They also thrive under the high shade cast by pine trees. Like azaleas, camellias do best in acid soil. If your soil pH is above 7, add an acidifier at planting time and feed your plant with fertilizer labeled for acid-loving plants.

Here’s a look at a few of the popular varieties Akin’s usually has in stock:

  • Nuccio’s Gem: a strong upright grower that bears loads of perfectly formed, pristine white semidouble flowers with a rosebud center in early to mid-season.
  • Cotton Candy: an early-season bloomers that bears masses of clear pink, semidouble flowers.
  • Kanjiro: a vigorous upright grower with early, rose-pink, semidouble flowers shading to rose-red on the petal edges.
  • Shishi Gashira: a compact, low-grower that bears early rosy-red, semidouble flowers. Named a Louisiana Super Plant.
  • Setsugekka: a moderate upright grower with masses of early, white, semidouble flowers bearing golden stamens.

Adding one, or more, of these camellias will give your eyes something beautiful to rest on during winter’s grayest, dreariest months.


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On January 1st, 2018 by Kathie Rowell

January garden tips

Posted In:
Blog-Tips | Tips

  • Get those tulip bulbs that have been chilling in your refrigerator planted as soon as possible.
  • Plant trees and shrubs so they can get a good root system started before the stress of next summer’s heat.
  • Camellias are likely to be in bloom, so you can choose the flower color and form you like best.
  • Start tomato seeds indoors in late January for transplanting into the garden after danger of frost is over.
  • Trim dead or freeze-damaged perennials.
  • Deadhead cool-season annuals.
  • Transplant established trees and shrubs while they are dormant.
  • Prune trees and shrubs that don’t flower in the spring, if necessary.
  • Get your soil tested. If amendments are required, a winter application will make them available for spring planting. We have LSU AgCenter soil test kits available.
  • Don’t overwater indoor plants, which need less moisture during winter than during the growing season.
  • Protect or bring indoors less-hardy cool-season plants, such as cyclamen, if temperatures are expected to drop below freezing. Hardy plants, such as pansies, violas and dianthus, may be burned by a hard freeze, but should recover.
  • Cut the faded flower stalk from the amaryllis plants you forced to bloom inside, then place them in a bright window until spring when they can be planted outdoors.
  • Plant your forced paperwhite bulbs outside after their blooms have faded. They should revert to their natural schedule and bloom again.
  • Plant seeds of rye grass or wheat grass in containers for a spot of fresh green on your window sill.
  • Begin cutting back the dead foliage on ornamental grasses.
  • Don’t let fallen leaves stay on your lawn all winter to avoid disease problems. Either mow over them to add organic matter to the lawn, build a compost bin or set aside an area for a compost pile.
  • Spray trees affected by scale insects with Hi-Yield Systemic Insect Spray or horticultural oil.
  • Prepare beds you plan to plant in spring by removing weeds, working in chopped leaves and compost and covering with mulch. No compost? We recommend Vital Earth compost.

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    Founded more than 60 years ago and still locally owned, Akin's takes pride in providing customers with friendly service, quality plants suited for our climate, professional landscape services and the kind of knowledgeable advice that comes from years of area gardening experience.
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